How do you TEST and not guess if you are prone to IR?Nutrisense

Here is a great blog post from our friends at Nutrisense.

“Testing for insulin resistance isn’t as straightforward as testing for prediabetes or diabetes, for which your doctor would request a fasting glucose or HbA1c (hemoglobin A1c test).

Insulin resistance is a complex physiological change that occurs over years and is hallmarked by two changes:

  1. Being an increase in insulin levels (hyperinsulinemia)
  2. Decreased insulin sensitivity in our cells.

One option is to take the glucose tolerance insulin response, or GTIR, test (also called the oral glucose tolerance test). It’s a functional test you can discuss with your functional medicine practitioner or registered dietitian nutritionist.

The NutriSense Nutrition Team uses and recommends this test. Your dietitian can best guide you through the oral glucose tolerance test and the optimal lab values for you.

Another option is the HOMA-IR, another functional test with varying optimal levels depending on factors such as age and gender (although used in research, this test isn’t often seen in clinical practice).

Unfortunately, there isn’t one single test to assess if we are insulin resistant or not. The best test is called a Hyperinsulinemic-Euglycemic Clamp and is very invasive. Because of that, it is only used in research settings. So instead, we have to look at the bigger picture with multiple factors involved. The NutriSense Nutrition Team recommends to assess the following:

  • CGM data: this can provide great insight into your metabolic health. Here you and your dietitian will want to monitor three trends: fasting glucose, postprandial (after meal) glucose, and glycemic variability (the “swings” in glucose). A higher fasting glucose value can be indicative of impaired fasting glucose and insulin resistance (in both the liver and muscle), so we want to see values between 70-90. A higher after meal value can tell us if insulin isn’t bringing glucose down to baseline quickly or effectively enough.
  • Fasting insulin levels: Similar to fasting glucose levels, this tells us some information about our insulin but only provides a snapshot into what’s happening in a fasted state. We want to see fasting insulin levels between 2-8.
  • HDL: aim for values > 60.
  • Triglycerides: aim for values <90.
  • TG to HDL ratio should be <1.
  • Waist circumference: <40 inches for men and <35 inches for women.
  • Blood pressure: aim for values < 120/80.
  • ALT & AST: aim for values 20 or less.
  • hsCRP: this gives us a good indication of general inflammation. Make sure not to exercise right before the test. Aim for values < 1.
  • Uric acid: aim for values <5.

Order your Nutri-Sense for 30-Days here

Here is the link for Nutrisense and discount code:

You can use my podcast discount code LOWCARBATHLETE

Head to Nutrisense page here 

Personally, I would look at the 3-month package but let them know you are doing just the package you ordered as they seem to go to “auto renewal” unless you let them know you only want the subscription for set time.  Each CGM (continuous glucose monitor) is good for 14-days so you would get two per month.  You can space them out how you would like to make them last longer.   I like my coaching clients to test for at least 30-days so you learn how foods and times of the month as well as training and stress levels in life impact your glucose.  Plus, we always want the doctor to measure our blood chemistry with INSULIN- precursor to type II diabetes.

Example of blood chemistry panel clients can ask to order for our FDNP clients via DHA Labs or ULTA Labs (click here)

Date:
Glucose
Uric Acid [Male]
Uric Acid [Female]
BUN
Creatinine
eGFR
BUN/Creatinine Ratio
Sodium
Potassium
Chloride
Carbon Dioxide (CO2)
Calcium
Phosphorous
Protein (Total)
Albumin
Globulin
A/G Ratio
Bilirubin (Total)
Alk Phosphatase
LDH
AST (SGOT) [Male]
AST (SGOT) [Female]
ALT (SGPT) [Male]
ALT (SGPT) [Female]
GGT (GGPT)
Lipid Panel
Cholesterol
Triglycerides
HDL Cholesterol
LDL Cholesterol
Triglycerides/HDL Ratio
Total Cholesterol/HDL Ratio
Complete Blood Count (CBC)
WBC
RBC [Male]
RBC [Female]
Hemoglobin [Male]
Hemoglobin [Female]
Hematocrit [Male]
Hematocrit [Female]
MCV
MCH
MCHC
RDW
Platelets
Neutrophils
Lymphocytes
Monocytes
Eosinophils
Basophils
Iron Panel
Iron (Serum)
TIBC
Iron Saturation
Ferritin
Thyroid Panel
TSH
Total T4
Free T4
Total T3
Free T3
T3 Uptake
Reverse T3
TPO Antibody (Thyroid Peroxidase Ab)
TBG Antibody (Thyroglobulin Ab)
TT3/RT3 Ratio
Free T3/RT3 Ratio
Additional Markers
Vitamin D
Insulin
Hemoglobin A1C
Homocysteine
Histamine (Whole Blood)
Hs-CRP [Male]
Hs-CRP [Female]
PSA [Male]
Fibrinogen
Anion Gap
Magnesium (RBC)
Vitamin B12 (serum)
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